War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0331 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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mules as may be absolutely necessary for the rations and tents of officers. All other trains and wagons than those just specified will be sent within the intrenchments covering City Point under the direction of the chief quartermaster of the army. Clerks, orderlies, and every other man on detached, special, extra, or daily duty will be armed and sent to the ranks for this operation, unless his services are absolutely necessary out of his regiment on the duties named. Arms and accouterments will be obtained for this purpose. If one of the forges and one of the battery wagons can be dispensed with they will be sent to the train of the Artillery Reserve within the intrenchments covering City Point. Such forage wagons as are indispensably necessary may be taken. This communication is merely intended to be advisory.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, October 24, 1864.

Major General A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: In the preparation for a movement it will scarcely be possible for the cavalry to carry on their persons three days' bread and small rations in addition to the three days' rations in the haversacks. Each trooper will carry twenty pounds of forage, which will last three days. There is no place that a cavalry soldier can carry extra rations, his haversack being full. I will manage to have four days' carried in the haversack, and these rations will last five days.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. McM. GREGG,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding Second Division.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 24, 1864.

Brigadier-General GREGG,

Commanding Cavalry, Army of the Potomac:

Instead of all the small-arm ammunition in wagons one-half only will probably be taken with you. Your reserve artillery ammunition may perhaps be parked on our present left, if a park should be formed there for the infantry corps. No spring-wagons will go with the troops. As much forage should be taken on the animals as practicable.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CITY POINT, VA., October 24, 1864.

Major General B. F. BUTLER,

Commanding Army of the James:

On Thursday morning, the 27th instant, General Meade will move from our left, with the design of seizing and holding the South Side Railroad. To facilitate this movement, or rather to prevent

re-enforcements going from the north side of James River to Petersburg, I wish you to demonstrate against the enemy in your front, substantially as we talked the matter over last evening and as you proposed. I do not want any attack made by you against intrenched and defended posi-