War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0325 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS, October 24, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel WILLIAM WILSON, Commanding First Brigade:

COLONEL: The brigadier-general commanding directs that you cause all the old works in front of Fort Stedman that obstruct the fire of the guns in the fort to be destroyed to-night by the garrison of the fort. The pioneer officer at these headquarters will furnish the necessary tools.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. R. DRIVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS, October 24, 1864.

COMMANDING OFFICER FIRST BRIGADE:

The brevet major-general commanding directs that you have all your available men report at once in front of headquarters Second Brigade for the purpose of cutting more of the timber in front of Fort Alexander Hays. The men will take all the axes they can get and the balance will be supplied from these headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. FINKELMEIER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, October 24, 1864-9 a.m.

General S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report that nothing of importance transpired in my front yesterday or last night. All was quiet. The battalion of the One hundred and eighty-eighth Regiment New York Volunteers, Major Davison commanding, arrived in the night and has been assigned to Griffin's division.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 24, 1864.

Major-General WARREN, Commanding Fifth Corps:

I am instructed to inform you that the contemplated movement will take place Wednesday night and Thursday morning. Orders to that effect will be duly issued. In the meantime the commanding general directs that the troops which are to hold the redoubts and inclosed batteries on the line of the Fifth Corps from Battery 24 to Fort Conahey and picket the front be assigned and posted. The number required for this duty by your estimate is 2,200; the number of guns thirty-two. This arrangement being made, the rest of your troops and artillery will be massed at convenient points for movement, out of view of the enemy. I have to state for your information that the troops left in the lines should have with them six days' full rations, and the ammunition for artillery and infantry previously prescribed. The troops that march will take three days' full rations in haversacks, and three