War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0316 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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CITY POINT, VA., October 24, 1864-3 p.m.

Major-General MEADE:

As soon as practicable after Thursday next send one of your reduced regular regiments to New York City to report to General Dix for duty.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, October 24, 1864-3 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I find the Tenth Infantry had present 5 officers and 176 enlisted men. This number is so small the regiment can be sent at once to New York if your desire it.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, VA., October 24, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

Order the Tenth U. S. Infantry to proceed to New York City without delay, and report to Major General John A. Dix for orders.

By command of Lieutenant-General Grant:

T. S. BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, October 24, 1864.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Armies in the Field:

GENERAL: With extreme reluctance I find myself compelled to call your attention to the following extract from an article published in the New York Independent of October 13, 1864:

He is the general (myself) * * * who, in the campaign from the Rapidan to the James under Grant, annulled the genius of his chief by his own executive incapacity; who lost the prize of Petersburg by martinet delay on the south bank of the James; who lost it again in succeeding contests by tactical incompetence; who lost it again by inconceivable follies of miliary administration when the mane was exploded; who insulted his corps commanders and his army by attributing to them that inability to co-operate with each other which was traceable solely to the unmilitary slovenliness of their general; who, in a word, holds his place by virtue of no personal qualifications, but in deference to a presumed, fictitious, perverted political necessity, and who hangs upon the neck of General Grant like an old man of the sea, whom he longs to be rid of, and whom he retains solely in deference to the weak complaisance of his constitutional commander-in-chief. Be other voices muzzled, if they must be, ours, at least, shall speak out on this question of enforced military subservience to political, to partisan, to personal requisitions. We, at least, if no others, may declare in the name of a wronged, baffled, indignant army, that its nominal commander is unfit, or unwilling, or incapable to lead it to victory, and we ask that General Grant's hand may be strengthened by the removal of Meade.