War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0277 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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about one mile and a half. Enemy placing rail abatis in front of rifle-pits connecting above and Cox's Ferry work. Think heavy guns have been mounted in work to their left of Cox's Ferry, as there is a screen of bushes where guns should be.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. R. CLUM,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 19, 1864. (Received 7 p. m.)

Colonel H. L. ABBOT:

Where is the 13-inch mortar? Is it where it can control the Chesterfield battery as well as near the Friend house? There is complaint from the Second Corps that the C[hesterfield] battery is very annoying.

H. J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., October 19, 1864-7 p. m.

Brigadier-General HUNT,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

The 13-inch mortar is quite effective upon the Chesterfield batteries. It can be placed where it is safe as long as Numbers 4 Battery (Burton's) is held. This is now a closed work with an infantry support. The platform is all laid and the magazine made. The mortar can be removed in five hours any night to where the locomotive can take it. The present fire is reported to be in reply to our fire on the new work in front of Fort McGilvery. Shall I send up the mortar?

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel Firs Connecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 19, 1864.

Colonel H. L. ABBOT:

Can you keep down the enemy's fire without the 13-inch mortar? If not, can you keep it down with that mortar? It is desirable not to brig it up if it can be avoided.

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., October 19, 1864-11.30 p. m.

Brigadier-General HUNT,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

The 13-inch mortar is very effective upon those batteries. It has been the problem ever since the army arrived to keep down their fire. It has never been entirely accomplished, and I do not believe it can be if the rebels are really bent on using them. They enfilade out lines and have so few men near them that no grant loss ensues from a very heavy fire on our part. They have recommenced firing in order to stop our