War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0236 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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reports that the enemy are extending and strengthening work just above Fort Clifton. The station at the Avery house reports small parties at work to-day between the Crater and point in front of Fort Sedgwick.

The following messages were intercepted:

5.10 A. M.

Colonel B:

The following observation were made from the station in front of General Steuart's brigade. Regiments of infantry went up the river, going to the front of the north side; wagons passed on same road going in same direction; one regiment of cavalry drilling in rear of the upper breast-works; the dredging-machine still at work near Dutch Gap. I also observed from Dunn's this afternoon the following; One regiment of infantry passed open space going to the front in Chesterfield; gun-boat above pontoon. This message was delayed last night by the fog.

J. Q. E.

(Same to A. B)

10.30 A. M.

Colonel B;

All quiet this a.m. Gun-boat at the pontoon.

J. A. S.,

At C.

(Same to A. B.)

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. STRYKER

Acting Chief Signal Officer.

SPECIAL ORDERS.

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Numbers 348.

Washington, October 15, 1864

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18. The leave of absence for twenty days granted Brigadier General I. Vogdes, U. S. Volunteers in Special Orders, Numbers 280, October 8, 1864. from headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, is hereby extended five days.

* * * * *

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ENGINEER BRIGADE AND DEFENSES OF CITY POINT, VA.

October 15, 1864

Lieutenant Colonel T. S. BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Armies of the United States:

SIR: I desire to lay before the lieutenant-general commanding a statement in relation to the great want of officers in the Engineer Brigade under my command, which, notwithstanding the repeated efforts made by myself, and seconded by his own approval, as also that of General Meade, still continues, to the great detriment of the efficiency of these two large regiments. The Fifteenth New York Engineers, really a battalion of three companies, formed in June, 1863, of three years' men of a two years' regiment had two companies added to it during the winter and spring. These five companies, all full, with about 150 men each, are now with these armies; one company detached from these headquarters to the bridges, of Deep Bottom, with two officers only, one with two officers only, detached in charge of the corps bridge trains of General Meade's army, and three companies are here in camp.