War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0233 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIRST DIV., 18TH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 103.

October 14, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel Patterson, Second New Hampshire Volunteers, is hereby temporarily assigned to the command of the Third Brigade of this division.

By command of Brigadier General Gilman Marston:

GEORGE A. BRUCE,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. KAUTZ'S CAVALRY DIVISION,

Numbers 9.

In the Field, October 14, 1864.

The First Maryland Cavalry, Colonel Evans commanding, and the First Mounted Rifles New York Volunteers, Colonel Sumner commanding, will constitute the Third Brigade of this division. Colonel Evans, of the Maryland cavalry, will assume command of the brigade.

By command of Brigadier-General Kautz:

THEO, H. SCHENCK,

Major and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

CITY POINT, October 15, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

Scouts of the enemy are cutting the wire between Powhatan and Jamestown about as rapidly as we can put it up. I am determined to stope this or clear out the country. To effect this object I wish you would send a regiment of cavalry. Let them go to Powhatan in the morning. I will send from here my escort company to go from there with them, and will send instructions by them. The escort knows the roads and country.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 15, 1864-8 p.m.

The foregoing dispatch is transmitted to Brigadier-General Gregg, who will in accordance therewith, send a regiment of cavalry, to be at Fort Powhatan to-morrow morning, to join the escort of the lieutenant-general commanding, and be governed by the instructions there received.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

OCTOBER 15, 1864.

Memorandum of General J. G. Barnard, chief engineer:

I have studied carefully the whole problem, and of the different operations which suggest themselves I cannot convince myself that there is any one offering chances enough of success, save that of waiting for an increase of the army, until we can get a marching column of 40,000 men. I cannot believe now that there is nay chance of surprising Richmond. If we had promptly withdrawn and (apparently) given it up and thrown