War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0212 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 13, 1864-12.20 p.m.

Brigadier General D. McM. GREGG,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to notify you that a deserter who came in this a.m. reports he overheard a conversation between Generals Heth and Archer as to a contemplated attack on our left and rear, in which Heth said the cavalry only would be employed.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

October 13, 1864

Brigadier General H. E. DAVIES,

Commanding First Brigade, Second Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to inform you that intelligence has been received by him from army headquarters of intended movement of the enemy's cavalry upon our left and rear. The general desires that every preparation be made to receive an attack; that the pickets be instructed to be particularly vigilant and the reserves be held in readiness for prompt action. It must be particularly insisted upon that your commanders on picket shall promptly report any advance of the enemy to the commander of the infantry behind them, those on the left to General Hancock. The forage and rations of regiments both in camp and on picket must be issued and not allowed to accumulate. The regiments must be kept ready for immediate service and every measure be taken to prevent a surprise.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. BIBBER,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,

October 13, 1864.

Colonel C. H. SMITH,

Commanding Second Brigade, Second Division:

COLONEL; The general commanding directs me to inform you that intelligence has been sent him from army headquarters to the effect that a movement is contemplated by the enemy's cavalry on our left and rear. The general commanding directs that pickets be instructed to be particularly watchful and vigilant, and that the reserves be kept ready for prompt action. Let your regiments have the rations and forage issued and in condition to move out quickly. The commanders on picket must be instructed to report any advance of the enemy to the infantry commanders in their vicinity-those on the extreme right to General Parke, those in front of the Gurley house to General Warren- and also to send word to your headquarters rapidly. The force picketing on the plank rod must be particularly watchful, and if necessary strengthened. Let every precaution be taken to prevent a surprise on any portion of your line. Let one of your regiments be kept saddled to-night.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. BIBBER,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.