War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0164 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS.

FIRST DIVISION.

In the First Brigade, Lieutenant-Colonel Raulston, commanding, reports that this whole command behaved in so creditable a manner that he has no individual instances of gallant conduct to report.

Second Brigade.

Asst. Surg. J. G. Porteous, One hundred and eighteenth New York Volunteers, deserves the highest credit for his bravery and attention to duties, being the only surgeon in the brigade advancing with his regiment in the charging column.

Lieutenant Colonel George F. Nichols, One hundred and eighteenth New York Volunteers, deserves honorable mention for the gallant manner, with a small number of men, with which he captured two redoubts on the right of Fort Harrison while the main assault was being made, and also for his cool conduct of the skirmish line in the general assault.

Lieutenant Campbell, One hundred and eighteenth New York, aide to Brigadier-General Burnham, carried an order to the assaulting column when near the brow of the fort under a heavy fire-a most gallant act.

Lieuts. N. J. Gibbs and H. J. Adams, of the same regiment, the first men in the redoubts, are commended for their presence of mind in turning the enemy's guns to bear upon them. They are respectfully recommended to his excellency the Governor of New York for promotion.

Corpl. Michael Finegan, One hundred and eighteenth New York, is reported for his cool and humorous courage in capturing a rebel, forcing him to stand on the parapet, face the enemy, and give three hearty cheers for the Union.

Private Franklin Johndro,* One hundred and eighteenth New York, was especially conspicuous, capturing forty prisoners after the enemy's assault of the 30th. He is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for gallant conduct.

Colonel Michael T. Donohoe, Tenth New Hampshire Volunteers, has credit for the gallant manner in which he advanced his skirmish line from Aiken's Landing, having his horse shot under him, and afterward being severely wounded.

Private James Bradbury [James Brady],* Tenth New Hampshire Volunteers, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for gallantry in capturing a rebel stand of colors.

William S. Simmons and Jacob Bishop, color-sergeants of the Eighth Connecticut Volunteers, are commended for planting their colors on the parapet of the fort among the earliest. Sergeants Bishop and Simmons are promoted to second lieutenants in the U. S. Colored Troops, with the approval of the President.

Corpl. Nathan E. Hickock,* Eighth Connecticut Volunteers, has honorable mention for his gallantry in capturing a rebel battle-flag, and is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal. His colonel will see that he has his warrant as a sergeant.

Chaplain Nathan Wardner, of the Ninety-sixth New York Volunteers, is specially commended for charging with his regiment in the advancing column, ready to administer the lasting consolations to the dying.

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*Awarded a Medal of Honor.

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