War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0161 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, October 11, 1864.

Colonel C. H. SMITH,

Commanding Second Brigade, Second Cavalry Division:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you send a regiment of your brigade on a reconnaissance in the direction of Stony Creek Station. It has been reported by contrabands and others that Major-General Whiting, with a force of 10,000 rebel infantry, has arrived at Stony Creek, and the object of this reconnaissance is to get so close to the station that information may be had from citizens or negroes of the truth of this report. It is not known that there is any force of the enemy, save 150 cavalry, east of the Weldon railroad, and this cavalry is at a mill between Reams' Station and the plank road. The regiment should start from here at 6 o'clock, and should move rapidly. Upon his return the commanding officer of the regiment will at once report in person to these headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. BIBBER,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, October 11, 1864.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

We have thirty-three deserters from the enemy this morning-ten, and a sergeant, from a Georgia battalion, lately from Mattox Station, on Richmond and Danville road, now in our front; two from the iron-clad Virginia, eighteen from local defense troops, and three negroes.

BENJAMIN F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, ARMY OF THE JAMES,

Before Richmond, October 11, 1864.

SOLDIERS OF THE ARMY OF THE JAMES:

The time has come when it is due to you that some word should be said of your deeds.

In accordance with the plan committed to you by the lieutenant-general commanding the armies, for the first time in the war, fully taking advantage of our facilities of steam marine transportation, you performed a march without parallel in the history of war.

At sunset of the 4th of May you were threatening the enemy's capital from West Point and the White House, within thirty miles on its eastern side.

Within twenty-four hours, at sunset on the 5th of May, by a march of 130 miles, you transported 35,000 men-their luggage, supplies, horses, wagons, and artillery-within fifteen miles of the south side of Richmond with such celerity and secrecy that the enemy were wholly unprepared for your coming, and allowed you without opposition to seize the strongest natural position on the continent. A victory all the more valuable because bloodless!