War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0152 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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enemy's loss is estimated by General Butler at 1,000. The Richmond Whig of the 8th, speaking of the attack, has the following:

The gallant General Gregg, commanding a Texan brigade, fell in the advance. Among other casualties we have to report General Bratton, of South Carolina, badly wounded; Colonel Haskell, Seventh South Carolina Infantry [Cavalry], severely wounded in face, and Major Haskell, of the South Carolina artillery, also wounded. Rumor stated that General Gary had been killed.

Since Friday there had been no fighting whatever.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

VARINA, October 10, 1864-1 p.m. (Received 3.45 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

I find our losses the other day [7th] were much less than first reported. Four hundred will cover our entire loss in killed, wounded, and captured. The enemy's loss was many more. About 150 were captured, and a great many dead fell into our hands. The loss of the enemy could not be less than 1,000 or 1,200.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, October 10, 1864-12 m. (Sent 12.10 p.m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT:

Nothing of importance occurred on the lines yesterday and last night. There was occasional picket-firing, and during the night a few discharges of artillery in the vicinity of the Jerusalem plank road. No indications of movements by the enemy reported either by deserters or signal officers.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, October 10, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Contrabands that left Petersburg last evening came into General Miles' lines this a.m. They came down the bank of the Appomattox on the Chesterfield side, and crossed the river at Covington. Some of them were bricklayers and have been recently employed at the Government lead-works. They reported no movement of troops since last Saturday, when there was a considerable movement to the enemy's right. The greater portion of Lee's army south of the Appomattox is concentrated on their right, the lines from the lead-works to the left, as far as the Appomattox, being very think, about three feet to a man in single line. All hospitals, commissary depots, Government work and railroad shops have been transferred to Danville; also the greater part of the rolling-stock of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. Last week several locomotives were taken to pieces and sent to