War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0069 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CITY POINT, October 4, 1864. (Received 10.30 a. m.)

Major-General MEADE:

I have changed my mind about going to Washington to-day; will put it off for several days.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

(Same to General Butler.)

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 4, 1864-11 a. m. (Sent 11.20 a. m.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Every part of my line is reported quiet, and no indications of movements beyond the accompanying dispatch from signal officers.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

October 4, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The following dispatch from the plank road station is respectfully forwarded:

8.30 A. M.

The body of infantry reported last evening as standing in the edge of woods midway between large fort west of the Weldon railroad and the lead-works in not visible this morning, and no indications of their being encamped in the woods. Most of the camps in vicinity of large fort are broken up and but little stir at that point.

The enemy has thrown up an additional earth-work in front of the crater made by the mine.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Major and Chief Signal Officer.

CITY POINT, Va., October 4, 1864.

(Received 11 p. m.)

Major-General MEADE:

I find that General Benham has got little or no work done yet on the line of fortifications he was directed to built. I have directed less elaborate works than he contemplated to be speedily thrown up. Until they are done this place is in danger of a cavalry raid, particularly if the enemy's cavalry returns here before we get ours back. I would like to have daily-scouting parties sent to the southeast to see that no movements is being made.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.