War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0035 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS, October 1, 1864-3 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel E. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

It is reported to me that the enemy seems to be maneuvering as if about to attempt an assault on our main work.

Very respectfully,

G. WEITZEL,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Before Richmond, October 1, 1864-6.15 p. m.

Major READ,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Eighteenth Army Corps:

Our pickets on the left, overlooking the open field running down to the river, report having seen a regiment moving up apparently from the enemy's pontoon bridge to our right; also that they heard cheering as if on the pontoon bridge.

C. J. PAINE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

OCTOBER 1, 1864.

General KAUTZ,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

I have directed General Birney, if the state of things in his front will justify it, to make a reconnaissance up the Darbytown road. You will co-operate with him, keeping a sharp lookout toward New Market. The cavalry force that was there has gone to Richmond.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION, Doctor Johnson's, Darby Road, October 1, 1864-8 p. m.

Major-General BUTLER, Commanding:

GENERAL: Colonel Spear has returned and reports that he drove the enemy into the intrenchments on the Charles City road. He reports seeing about a regiment of cavalry. Thinks if my division had been there it would have gone over the works. Says he could see Richmond very distinctly. He had 3 men wounded, 1 man missing, and 4 horses killed. I hold the same position I did this morning and picket on the Charles City road.

Very respectfully,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, VA., October 2, 1864-8.30 p. m.

Major-General HALLECK, Washington:

General Butler, on the right of the James, and General Meade, southwest of Petersburg, occupy the same position as yesterday. There has been very little fighting to-day; a few prisoners, however, have been