War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1239 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC,-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

It requires about 1,250 men to do the necessary service of the post, supplying all the guards and giving proper reliefs to the soldiers. This will appear as follows:

Guard posts in city.......................... 81

Privates to each post........................ 3

243

Men to be on duty every third day............ 3

Privates required................................ 729

On Belle Isle, privates per day.............. 150

3

Relief every third day........................... 450

Total............................................ 1,179

Then there should be a small margin for sick, supernumeraries, and guards to send away in charge of prisoners when moved and Yankee deserters going to the lines of the enemy under General Orders, Numbers 65. This would make the 1,250 or 1,300. It is possible to make men do guard duty every other day; but it should be remember that the reserves are composed mostly of old and in many cases infirm men. I would respectfully suggest that two or more battalions of reserves or other troops be assigned especially to this duty and placed immediately under the orders of the post commander. General Winder had two battalions of regular troops, amounting in numbers to my estimate above. If my suggestions are accepted, the guards can then be told off at regular brigade guard mounting and posted by the proper officer.

I wish it to be understood that my relations with General Kemper and Colonel Moore are of the most agreeable character. I find them most cautious and disposed to give me what assistance they can and to act in harmony with me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. M. GARDNER,

Brigadier-General.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS POST OF RICHMOND, October 24, 1864.

Respectfully referred to the Adjutant and Inspector General for his information.

Condition of guard service represented in letter of 8th of September somewhat changed but not improved. Colonel Duke's battalion removed; no force to supply its place. There [are] upward of 2,000 prisoners of war now in the city; these cannot be sent south at present. I do not see, under the present arrangements, any use of a post commandant, except to lodge complaints against when prisoners escape on their transit south or in the city. The necessity of furnishing a proper garrison for the city and the possibility of doing it is for my superiors to decide.

W. M. GARDNER,

Brigadier-General.

[Second indorsement.]

NOVEMBER 2, 1864.

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War, with the recommendation that Brigadier-General Gardner be at once assigned to duty