War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1184 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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30-pounder Parrotts now are. Please confer with such superior officers as you it proper to consult, and if your final judgment agrees with ours let these arrangements be made.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. N. PENDLETON,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

HDQRS. ARTILLERY, ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

August 17, 1864

Colonel WALKER,

Commanding Artillery, Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia:

COLONEL: General Alexander and myself to-day examined the lines about Chamberlayne's battery. We should have been very glad to have had your counsels and would have asked you to join us, but I supposed your boils would not permit you to ride and walk so far. We concur, among other points, in the judgment that the three 24-pounder howitzers which you now have in position to use as mortars will be much more useful for the general line placed elsewhere, and that three Coehorn mortars in their stead will answer there better. It seems very probable that the enemy is moving in earnest toward Chamberlayne's battery, and it is of the first importance to prepare strong defense there. Toward this we think one of those 24-pounder howitzers had better be in one of the three pits in rear of Chamberlayne's prepared for 32-pounder Blakely, an 8-inch howitzer and one 32-pounder Blakely being also there. The other two howitzers (24-pounders) and the other two Blakelys may perhaps be best placed in the knob behind the Griffith house. The two 30-pounder Parrotts had best, we think, be removed to the north side of the Appomattox, their ammunition being so unsafe to fire with over our line, and in their stead two 8 or 10 inch mortars might be there used to advantage, and perhaps an 8-inch howitzer in front of them where Garden had two guns. I wish you to confer with General Alexander on these several points as soon as possible, and also with Colonel Stevens and General Hill, as it may be necessary to have their views in the case, and as far as can be done without contravening any important judgment, let the proposed arrangements be carried into effect with the least possible delay. The prospect of such operations by the enemy and these adjustments render it advisable for us to defer the exchange of certain battalions between General Alexander and yourself of which we had spoken.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. N. PENDLETON,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

NEAR PETERSBURG, VA., August 17, 1864-10 a. m.

General R. E. LEE,

Chaffin's Bluff:

All quiet here yesterday and last night. No material change reported in enemy's movements or position. Thirty-six wagons and ten ambulances passed this morning on military road, rear [of] Battery 5, going in direction of City Point.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.