War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1116 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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been taken out of your line. They may attack; if so, it will be just at night or at daybreak. You might show them your force by displaying it on the lines. Have your reveille at 4 o'clock.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

IN THE FIELD, BEFORE RICHMOND,

September 29, 1864.

Major General B. F. BUTLER:

SIR: I have the honor to report that at the time the Tenth Corps made the advance on the third fort from my left I ordered a brigade, under Colonel Jourdan, to attack the middle fort and carry it. Almost the instant I made the attack the firing on the part of the Tenth Corps ceased, and the fire of these three forts was at once centered on my brigade in addition to a heavy infantry fire on our left flank, compelling our force to retire. I am now holding the old position waiting further orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. HECKMAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., September 29, 1864.

Colonel JAMES W. SAVAGE,

Twelfth New York Cavalry:

COLONEL: The commanding general directs me to send you the inclosed telegram from Colonel Hitchcock for your information. He wishes you to send out a reconnaissance, as far as you may deem prudent, to find out if there be any truth in this, and, if so, what the real state of the case is. As it is possible the enemy may have planted torpedoes in the road your scout will take, he advises that the column move very slowly and that two dismounted men be sent well in advance to carefully examine the road for any suspicious indications.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. JUDSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

BATCHELDER'S CREEK, September 29, 1864.

Brigadier-General HARLAND,

Commanding:

It is reported by two deserters from the Sixth North Carolina Cavalry that the enemy are taking the rails from the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad to build an ion-clad ant the Roanoke River, nine miles below Weldon. The deserters say they have commenced one mile this side of Gum Swamp rifle-pits. They have six army wagons, guarded by sixty men. They leave Kinston about 6 a. m. If this is true I have no doubt the shells placed in the road on our front is to detect a move on our part. The deserters have been sent to the provost-marshal. Their name save Wilkins and Hamilton.

G. H. HITCHCOCK,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding 132nd New York Volunteers.