War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1101 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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P. S.-I inclose a communication just received from Colonel Lynch, First Brigade. Captain Ricker, the officer mentioned in it, observed the enemy moving apparently to our left, before he left the line of works, going down the river two or three miles. He observed the heavy column mentioned in the dispatch as moving to our right. He made his observation from the Mills house, where a good view was observed. I recommend that a signal station be established there in the morning. I consider it evident that the movements to our left observed to-day were intended to mislead us, and that they are now moving a considerable force to our right.

Respectfully,

N. A. MILES,

Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

FIRST BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

September 29, 1864-6.45 p. m.

Captain DRIVER:

Captain Ricker, of my staff, reports having seem from the lookout near the Mills house, a heavy column of the enemy's infantry moving on the road from Petersburg to Port Walthall toward our right. He watched the column for fifteen minutes where it showed in an open space, both ends being concealed in the woods.

JAMES C. LYNCH,

Colonel, Commanding.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

September 29, 1864.

Brigadier-General MILES,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that he understands you desire a battery in a certain place. There is but one reserve battery, but in case you are attacked to-night it will be placed in the position you desire.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. BINGHAM,

Major, Judge-Advocate and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

FRIEND HOUSE SIGNAL STATION,

September 29, 1864-10.45 p. m.

General HANCOCK:

Some picket and artillery firing on both sides. No attack. All quiet.

MILES,

General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

September 29, 1864.

Brigade commanders will impress on the minds of their men on picket to-night the necessity of the utmost vigilance. Any sign of movement on the part of the enemy will be promptly reported to these headquarters, and one-half of their command will be constantly awake during the night and kept under arms.

By command of Brevet Major-General Mott:

J. P. FINKELMEIER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.