War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1059 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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case you reach Richmond, the details for garrisoning and holding the place are left to or the senior officer of the troops that get in. One thing I would say, however, all the bridges connecting the city with the south side should be destroyed at once or held beyond a peradventure. As the success of the enterprise depends entirely on celerity, the troops will go right. They will take only a single blanket rolled and carried over the shoulder, three days' rations in haversack, and sixty rounds of ammunition in box and on the person. No wagons will be taken. They will be supplied, however, with six days' rations, half forage for the same time, and forty rounds of extra ammunition for men, to follow if they should be required. No wagons will cross the James River till ordered by you. The whole of the force under General Meade will be under arms at 4 a.m. on the 29th, ready to attack Petersburg or move to South Side road, as circumstances may determine. As against any force now north of the James River you can go to Richmond even without a surprise. If enemy resists you by sufficient force to prevent your advance, it is confidently expected that General Meade can gain a decisive advantage on his end of the line. The prize sought is either Richmond or Petersburg, or sa position which will secure the fall of the latter. Please furnish me with a copy of your detailed instructions.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE JAMES, September 27, 1864-11.15 a.m.

His Excellency Governor CONY,

Augusta, Me.:

The Eighth and Eleventh Maine regiments are in my command and are weak. They will require about 500 men each to bring them to full efficiency. Can you not send me a detachment of about that number of recruits that may be put in these regiments? One recruit in an old regiments is worth two in a new organization. If you cannot do this I do not see but that we must consolidate the regiments, which I should regret to do. Please answer by telegraph.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

September 27, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel GEORGE A. KENSEL,

Acting Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: The signal officer at tower on James River reports: "About 200 infantry going across the rear of Chaffin's farm toward New Market road.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. R. CLUM,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer.