War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1006 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

September 24, 1864.

Brigadier-General FOSTER,

Commanding Second Division:

The major-general commanding directs that you send fifty men of your command immediately to relieve the men of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, doing picket duty on your right; the men to remain until relieved by those of the Second Corps.

Respectfully,

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-general.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 125. In the Field, Va., September 24, 1864.

The provisions of General Orders, Numbers 111, from these headquarters, are so far modified as to permit officers on picket duty and officer of the day to allow the exchange of papers between the pickets, with a view of encouraging desertions from the enemy. This privilege must be exercised without any relaxation in the strict performance of picket duty.

By command of Major General E. O. C. Ord:

THEODORE READ,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

September 24, 1864-7.30 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The report alluded to in the dispatch* received from the lieutenant-general no doubt has its foundation in a change made day before yesterday under the direction of the cavalry commander. I did not have men sufficient to hold out to Cocke's Mill, consequently the telegraph road was not covered, and therefore the pickets on the road leading from Rollins' to Sycamore Church were withdrawn and placed on the telegraph road, so as to watch all the roads on my left. This was done at the suggestion of General Davies, who was here in person. There is no information of any force except scouts of the enemy anywhere in my front. I have sent out to Colonel Spear to ascertain what foundation there is for the report, but I feel confident that nothing unusual has occurred. General Gregg was here this afternoon, and has arranged to strengthen my line by relieving a portion of it with a regiment from his division. While i cannot be expected to hold my line against any force, I can promise to furnish the earliest intelligence of an advancing force.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General.

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*See Grant to Meade, beginning-The infantry commander, &c., p. 988.

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