War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0989 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

no changes of the enemy's line. A rumor has been current that Whiting's division of North Carolina militia had been added to the army in our front, and was lying between A. P. Hill's corps ad Beauregard's command. One of informants (the most intelligent) says it a mere rumor, and he thinks no re-enforcements have been received. Heth's division, or a part of it, is lying on the left of Hill's corps and connects with Johnson's division, of Beauregard's command. Hoke's division is in reserve.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. C. BABCOCK.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

September 24, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Our men met last night three several agents, who returned from Richmond yesterday. From different sources the following information is obtained. A very large force of cavalry is encamped on New Market Hill. It is understood that General Wade Hampton is personally in command, and that the force comprises his own division, with the most of all the cavalry belonging to the enemy. Unusual vigilance is exercised on the north side of the James, and large details for scouting purposes have been made from the Texas brigade on that side of the river. One of our agents yesterday morning, while perfecting his arrangements to leave town, saw a soldier of General Early's command with whom he was acquainted. The soldier was reading one of yesterday's papers, and referring to the accounts of the fights in the Valley, and the way in which the rebel loss was underestimated, remarked as follows:

This paper is a humbug, and what it says about Early is a lie. I have just come from him, and he is this side of Gordonsville, having been obliged to fight heavily all the way.

From another we learn that there was a rumor in circulation in Richmond yesterday that Early was eighteen miles this side of Gordonsville. Immediately after the fall of Atlanta gold had a large advance; after that, it receded to 2300 per cent. Day before yesterday, after the news from Early, it advanced to 2600 per cent., and yesterday the brokers announced that for the present no sales of it would be made. They were unwilling to fix any price at which they would sell it. All kinds of meat advanced yesterday $w per pound. It was said that guns were being forwarded as rapidly as possible from the arsenal in Richmond to the front, and there is reiteration of the former news that all business is suspended for a time, and no work to be done in the Government manufactories, except such as can be done by the employment of our deserters. The former rumors in regard to the abandonment of Petersburg were still in circulation in Richmond, and seem to have gained strength. Our agents could not find that these rumors rested on any new facts. No wounded from Early were being received in Richmond, nor were there any but scattering arrivals from him. There were about 100 men in each of the batteries in the last line of works about Richmond; nothing at all in the two outer lines. Files of Richmond papers are forwarded herewith.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE H. SHARPE,

Colonel, &c.