War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0962 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND. N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, FIRST DIV., TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Petersburg, Va., September 21, 1864.

Captain A. TERRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that no changes have taken place in the disposition of this command during the last twenty-four hours. The officer of the trenches reports this morning:

Circumstances at the front of this brigade during last night were as heretofore, there being nothing observable in the movements of the enemy.

No casualties during the last twenty-four hours.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. C. VORIS,

Colonel Sixty-seventh Ohio Volunteers, Commanding First Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Petersburg, Va., September 21, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Tenth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that no changes have taken place on my line in the disposition of troops. Six hundred men were engaged on fatigue duty during the day or night on the various works, as stated in yesterday's report. The works on my line are progressing rapidly.

Respectfully, yours,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

September 21, 1864-7 p.m.

Captain H. C. WEIR,

Assistant adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: A confused report comes in from the pickets at Sycamore Church that a considerable force was seen this evening some distance south of the church moving east. The men on picket said there was artillery with them. They think to-day that they heard buglers and chopping last night. An officer of the First District of Columbia Cavalry, just in from there, says he went out on the road some distance and saw three horsemen. A sergeant, who had been out some distance farther, says he saw the track of a considerable force on a road running east. I will send a scout out in the morning to ascertain if there is any force in that direction. The First District of Columbia Cavalry are so nervous since their disaster that I do not place much confidence in their reports. The pickets were at Sycamore Church, and the telegraph road is there open. I have not men enough to picket to Cocke's Mill.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General.