War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0841 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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regiments. They all got off at 4 a.m. The infantry have reached the point (Poplar Grove Church) at which I directed them to halt and cover the roads coming in and let the cavalry attempt to penetrate farther. From Major Roebling's dispatch of 7.45 a.m. I think it probable a farther advance will not be practicable, and they will then need instructions whether to stay there till forced back or withdraw. I do not think it advisable to send any body of infantry beyond the church.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, September 15, 1864-9.50 a.m. (Received 9.55 a.m.)

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

Since sending you my dispatch of 9.30 a.m. your dispatch of 9.30 a.m. has been received. The object of the reconnaissance was to obtain information of the supposed movements of the enemy. Whenever you are satisfied no further information can be obtained withdraw the troops. It is not intended or wished that they should remain out until forced back.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, September 15, 1864-10.30 a.m.

General HUMPHREYS:

I sent out word to General Baxter to withdraw as soon as he had accomplished all he deemed practicable in the way of a reconnaissance. The officer just returned from the Poplar Spring Church says: I found General Baxter near the church, from which point he had sent his advance one mile. Had not found the enemy in force nor any evidence of the passing of any considerable body of troops.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, September 15, 1864-10.40 a.m. (Received 10.45 a.m.)

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

The wagons of the Fifth Corps near the plank road are in sight of the enemy's batteries and draw their fire upon the reserve troops of the Second Corps. There is woods on the right of the Second Corps headquarters, behind which they would be concealed from the view of the enemy.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.