War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0828 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, September 14, 1864.

Colonel CHARLES H. SMITH,

Commanding Second Brigade, Second Division, Cavalry:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you detail two strong and efficient regiments from your command (in command of a colonel or lieutenant-colonel) to report to General Warren at daylight to-morrow (15th instant). This command will take two days' rations of subsistence and one day's forage, and will leave here at 3 a.m.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. C. WEIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,

September 14, 1864.

Brigade commanders and battery commanders will have their respective commands saddled, harnessed, and hitched up at daylight to-morrow (the 15th instant). This order not to affect your previous order.

By command of Brigadier-General Gregg:

H. C. WEIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ORDNANCE OFFICE,

Fort Monroe Arsenal, Va., September 14, 1864.

Colonel H. L. ABBOT,

Commanding Siege Artillery, Broadway Landing, Va.:

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th instant with regard to 13-inch mortar fuses. In reply I would state that the fuses referred to were recently received here from the North, and that those of the same lot which I have examined since the receipt of your letter appeared to be perfectly good. If you will return me some of those which were filled with sawdust or otherwise defective. I will have the matter fully investigated. In some cases I find the priming in the top of the fuse is separated from the case, and if this should happen to fall out the fuse would not be likely to ignite; but by leaving the paper can on the fuse and cutting a small hole in it the priming will be kept in its place and there should be no difficulty with the ignition of the fuse.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. EDSON,

Captain of Ordnance, Commanding.

DUTCH GAP, VA., September 14, 1864.

Colonel HENRY L. ABBOT,

Commanding Siege Artillery:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the enemy opened from a new battery to-day, making a few good shots at the canal. Fired at them slowly with the tree 8-inch mortars, the 10-pounder Parrott, the 10-inch sea-coast mortar, and the 100-pounder Parrott, causing them