War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0781 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, September 10, 1864.

General WILLIAMS:

Nothing of any importance on my line. The enemy opened a vigorous artillery fire yesterday at 12 m. This was responded to, and a sharp picket-fire was kept up all night. The Coehorns interrupted the work on their approaches, but they seem to have worked during the night.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.

HDQRS. LIGHT ARTILLERY BRIGADE, TENTH ARMY CORPS, Before Petersburg, Va., September 10, 1864.

Captain CHARLES H. GRAVES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Tenth Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Artillery Brigade during the last twenty-four hours: Ninety rounds were fire by our batteries at the enemy, he having opened nearly all his guns along our front at 1.40 p. m. yesterday. One casualty: Private Ayers, of Company C, First u. S. Artillery, attached to Light Battery D, First U. S. Artillery, severely wounded in the thigh.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. JACKSON,

Lieutenant Colonel, Asst. Inspector-General and Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, Before Petersburg, Va., September 10, 1864.

Brigadier General A. H. TERRY,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: It is time now to attend to the filling up of your division. Many men will go out of service during the month. Men can be had for the asking and proper attention. Regimental, brigade, and division commanders are really responsible for the number of men in their commands. Application for detail of officers of mark to go home and fill up regiments will be approved. It behooves every officer in these the last days of this wicked rebellion to be on the alert and by proper attention keep up his command. Every attention should be paid to getting back of detached men, convalescents, and keeping up of the corps to a proper number. It will hereafter, when this wicked war is over, be a proud record for an officer or soldier to have endured on and not given up or yielded for a moment his earnest desire to continue in the army to the death.

Respectfully,

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General, Commanding.

(Same to Brigadier-General Foster and Colonel Howell.)