War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0780 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS SIGNAL DETACHMENT, TENTH CORPS, September 10, 1864.

Captain GRAVES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Tenth Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: The signal officer at the Avery house station of observation reports small working parties of the enemy at work in three places in front of the Crater. Nothing visible but the dirt which is thrown up by them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

PAUL BRODIE,

First Lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, in charge 10th Corps Detach.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF VA. AND N. C.,

Numbers 249.

In the Field, Va., September 10, 1864.

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7. So much of Special Orders, Numbers 123, paragraph 4, issued from headquarters Eighteenth Army Corps, as relates to the command of Colonel H. L. Abbot, commanding siege artillery, is hereby revoked, and Colonel Abbot will, as heretofore, report only to these headquarters.

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By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN, Broadway Landing, Va., September 10, 1864.

Captain T. EDSON,

Ordnance Officer, Fort Monroe:

CAPTAIN: I inclose a requisition for 100 fuses for my 13-inch mortar. The last lot were very defective. It is reported to me that fifty were destroyed before one fit to use was found. Some were filled with saw-dust; others very badly worm eaten. As we fire over our own men for about a mile, it is essential that we have good fuses, and I hope the new lot will be carefully selected. Please forward them by the mail boat at the earliest opportunity, as they are waited for.

Your obedient servant,

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

DUTCH GAP, VA., September 10, 1864.

Colonel HENRY L. ABBOT,

Commanding Siege Artillery:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the enemy have fired but fifteen or twenty shots to-day and those in the forenoon; not a shot has been fired since dinner. A deserter from their battery reported that there were 15 killed and wounded by our light pieces to-day, and "he'll damned if he'll stay there any longer." Wish they'd all come to the same wise conclusion. Please have no more 8-inch shell sent at present, but send plenty of case-shot for the light 12-pounder gun. There is no firing nights. Men are healthy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. PIERCE,

Captain, First Connecticut Artillery.