War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0778 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS, September 10, 1864.

Colonel ROBERT McALLISTER,

Commanding Third Brigade:

COLONEL: The brigadier-general commanding directs that you relieve all the troops on picket of the First Brigade which are posted to the left of the Jerusalem plank road; that the Second Regiment U. S. Sharpshooters when relieved from the front by you will be stationed in the fort located on the said plank road as an addition to the regular reserve for the pickets. You will be particular that the connections are made both on the right and left, that the works are strengthened, and that every effort that can will be made to hold the picket-line against any attack of the enemy. The greatest possible vigilance will be exercised both by the pickets and reserves; they will be constantly on the alert, as the position gained last night is most important, and it is expected the enemy will make great effort to regain it. A detail of 100 men from the Second Brigade will relieve the left of your picket-line, under the direction of the division officer of the day.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. T. LOMBARD,

Captain Judge-Advocate and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, September 10, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report that nothing unusual occurred in front of my line yesterday or last night. Two hundred men were at work yesterday on the defenses and 400 men assisting the engineers in building the new wagon road.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, September 10, 1864.

General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I think the double track corduroy road unnecessary just now, except across the bad places where a second track should be placed alongside of the single one. We have a good many other roads and the railroad. It is very important to us now to give as much of our attention as possible to drilling the recruits and restoring the discipline and morale of the troops. I have worked my command very steadily, half their strength nearly each day, and it makes us neglect purely military matters of greatest importance. I have furnished details much greater than have been called for to get necessary work done, as the locations of these roads and changes of fortifications keep the camps disturbed and prevent drilling. Every time we change camp here we have to build new roads, open ditches, dig wells, &c., which of itself occasions much labor, and I am anxious to have the arrangements be come a little settled, and so have volunteered help everywhere I could. I think, though, that double-track corduroy is not now called for.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.