War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0765 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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We have a very small mark to fire at, and of course cannot hit every time. Our average shots are as good as could be expected. The rebels seem to fire now and then simply out of spite. Tried the light guns to-day and thought they did good execution. Shall try them again to-morrow and save the 8-inch shells as much as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. PIERCE,

Captain, First Connecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, September 9, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Nothing new on my line. The enemy are pushing forward four trenches, saps, or approaches, to my works. They are seven feet deep, five feet wide. A scout of mine crept up to them last evening and so reports. Can't imagine their use. I will place my Coehorn mortars in position near them to-day and try and stop further progress. The redoubts are in fair progress.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, In the Field, September 9, 1864.

Brigadier General A. H. TERRY,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to furnish you the following copy of a telegram just received:

General BIRNEY:

At 1 o'clock to-night I propose to try and capture or drive off the enemy's picket-line in my front to the right and left of the plank road.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. H. GRAVES,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, FIRST DIV., TENTH ARMY CORPS, Before Petersburg, Va., September 9, 1864.

Captain A. TERRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report all quiet this morning. The enemy kept up a fire of musketry last night. The officer of the trenches reported yesterday evening:

The enemy have opened two embrasures in the works about fifty yards to the right of the Crater. They have strengthened their works much, and are working at what appears to be the saps approaching our line, two from the east and one from the northeast face of the Crater. They had a fatigue party of 100 men at work last night. The trenches distant from the fort appear to be diminished.

There is no doubt that saps are being run from their line steadily toward ours. Musketry can do little toward preventing the work, as