War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0762 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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care that no light or noise may cause the enemy's pickets to suspect, and still less to ascertain, that any movement is going on in our line. During the temporary withdrawal of the Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania, the One hundred and twenty-fourth and Eighty-sixth New York Volunteers will spread their lines to the left so as to fill up the gap to Fort Warren. During the temporary withdrawal of the Twentieth Indiana, the Fortieth New York Volunteers will spread its line to the left so as to connect with the Seventeenth Maine. It is recommended that the men should not be informed of any intended movement before the hour appointed for its execution.

By command of Brigadier General R. de Trobriand:

JAS. M. LINNARD,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, THIRD DIV., SECOND ARMY CORPS, September 9, 1864.

CAPTAIN COMMANDING THE PICKET LINE:

You will get your men quietly under arms at 12.30 o'clock to-night. The pickets on your right, at the head of the plank road, are to be advanced at 1 o'clock precisely. If the pickets on your front make any demonstration to advance you must repulse them, or if they commence firing on our troops to the right you will return the fire, so as to relieve our troops as much as possible. You will therefore see the importance of having your men all under arms and in good position, so as to repulse the enemy should they attack you, or to fire upon them should they open on our troops to your right. Use great caution in getting your pickets under arms, so as not to attract the attention of the enemy.

Respectfully, yours,

B. R. PIERCE,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND CORPS, September 9, 1864.

Colonel R. McALLISTER, Third Brigade:

COLONEL: During the operation to-night you will please instruct your pickets and the reserve that they must not fire unless the party operating is driven back and there is danger of an assault from the enemy, and to be very careful not to fire on our own troops. It may be necessary for you to advance the left of your line after the new line is established. You will act accordingly.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. MOTT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, September 9, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report that nothing of importance occurred yesterday or last night. Working parties, numbering 200 men, were at work during the day on the defenses at this point.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.