War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0756 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, TENTH CORPS, September 8, 1864.

Captain ADRIAN TERRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I am satisfied that the enemy are pushing two saps from the Crater toward the salient point of our picket-line to the front of the Crater. The work does not appear to be pushed with much vigor. I could discover, say, two or these shovels at work at the same time in each sap. Would it not be a good plan to annoy them as much as possible from the picket-line by musketry? I have given instructions to the officer in command of the picket detail to give special attention to this matter and report promptly any discoveries he may make.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. C. VORIS,

Colonel Sixty-seventh Ohio Volunteers, Commanding Brigade.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, KAUTZ'S CAVALRY DIVISION, In the Field, September 8, 1864.

Captain M. J. ASCH,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I send down to-day a party of contrabands who came in yesterday and to-day. They represent that the enemy have disappeared from our front, excepting a few scattering scouts. According to their accounts, the farmers are thrashing out their grain with all possible dispatch, and hurrying it and their prime negroes beyond Dinwiddie Court-House. At one point, about six miles beyond our lines, is a farmer named Heth or Heath who has about 600 bushels of wheat and a greater quantity of prime oats already trashed and winnowed out. This had not been moved two days ago. I have ordered out all the dismounted men who can be spared from the dismounted camp of the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and propose organizing a dismounted party of picked men to ferret out those scouts and bushwhackers who are continually annoying our pickets. They sometimes get within our lines for the purpose of obtaining intelligence. Lieutenant-Colonel Jacobs, Third New York Cavalry, reports that he was fired upon near Sturdivant's Mill by a scout or bushwhacker three days ago. I think the party I propose to organize, judiciously handled, will be of more service here than lying idle in camp. If there is any objection, will you please notify me.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROB. M. WEST,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

WASHINGTON, September 9, 1864-2.50 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The recruiting returns show an average of about 5,000 mustered in per day for the last week.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.