War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0703 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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corps had gone to our left to flank us off the railroad. When he left his own regiment had one day's rations only on hand. He saw none of Longstreet's troops himself. I suppose you got the report from the signal station this afternoon, reporting a heavy cloud of dust west of Weldon railroad, extending southward and continuing half an hour. Thinks none of Hill's or Beauregard's troops have moved.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Respectfully forwarded for what it is worth.

JNO. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

September 5, 1864.

General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

major Duane proposed to connect the large redoubt on plank road, Fort Crawfrod, with the advanced work by a line of abatis. Some connection ought to be made without delay. I have two batteries in reserve. If a strong abatis or palisading is made as above I could get out another. General Mott has about twenty guns on the right of his line, and thinks one battery could be spared from this particular place. None of them, however, belong to my corps, but one might be taken to replace one of my own batteries, say Ames', and I would then have three or four batteries available to move. General Mott has now on his line, beginning at the Strong house, forty-nine guns.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

September 5, 1864-10.15 p. m.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

General Hunt is looking up some batteries for you, and will dispose those he gets so as to relieve some of yours now in position. I understand the engineers have asked for 3,000 men. Of these 1,000 are for the abatis, wiring, and draining of covered ways, all on Mott's front. The abatis and wiring, I understand from Major Duane, ought to be completed in six hours' work. The abatis and wiring, I believe, you regard as essential to the security of your front, and they should therefore claim precedence over other work. The 2,000 men are for the epaulements, rifle-pits, and slashing at the Williams house and that vicinity. This is one of the most important parts of the rear line and should perhaps take precedence of the continuation of the line toward the Norfolk railroad, if both cannot go on at the same time. But probably it would be best to equalize the strength of the working parties on those two parts of the rear line if you cannot supply the full requisition of the engineers carrying on that at the Williams house. The whole