War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0694 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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to occupy the whole division front in case such a withdrawal is needed. The Forty-seventh New York and Ninth Maine Regiments will report to you in addition to your own brigade. All of One hundred and forty-second New York will be brought onto the line, except enough to guard the fords of the river. This will give you about 1,650 available men. You will have charge of the entire line and will be held responsible for its proper defense. All cooks, clerks, and other special and extra duty men on the line, also all convalescents, will be used in defense. These dispositions are understood by the commanding officers of the other brigades and will be carried into effect promptly if orders are received.

Respectfully, yours,

P. A. DAVIS,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS,

September 4, 1864-2 p.m.

General RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff:

I have arrived here and assumed command of the Eighteenth Corps.

JOHN GIBBON,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 16.

OFFICE CHIEF OF ARTILLERY,

September 4, 1864.

* * * * *

2. Major Cook, First Connecticut Artillery, having reported for duty, is placed in charge of the batteries of his regiment and the companies of the Thirteenth New York Artillery and of the Third Pennsylvania Artillery, now on duty within the limits of the Eighteenth Army Corps.

By command of A. Piper, colonel and chief of artillery:

F. W. PAUL,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

September 4, 1864-9 a.m.

Captain WEIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Cavalry Division:

CAPTAIN: In reply to your dispatch of last evening, I have to state that, as the execution of the order regarding the First District of Columbia Cavalry is not intrusted to me, I cannot say when the transfer will be made. There is great dissatisfaction in the regiment about the order, and the officers say it will be countermanded. It virtually breaks up and destroys one of the most efficient regiments in the service. They are much discouraged by the order, as they have heretofore felt great pride in their regiment on account of being armed with a peculiar and effective weapon. If General Gregg would picket the portion of the line between the railroad and the plank road it would