War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0693 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Pennsylvania, reports an expenditure of fifty-seven rounds. The whole number of rounds expended by the artillery is 227. The enemy opened quite briskly from their mortar batteries about 7.30 or 8 o'clock last evening. No casualties. The sanitary condition of works and batteries is constantly and rapidly improving. With the exception of the Hare battery the whole line is in fair order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. JACKSON,

Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Inspector-General and Chief of Artillery.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIRST DIV., 10TH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 25.

Before Petersburg, Va., September 4, 1864.

Rebel newspapers frequently afford information of the greatest value even when, to the casual observer, they seem to contain no items of any importance. Hereafter all such papers received within our lines, whether by gift, purchase, or exchange, by any commissioned officer or enlisted man, will be immediately sent to these headquarters, in order that they may be forwarded to the major-general commanding.

By order of Brigadier General A. H. Terry:

A. TERRY,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, FIRST DIV., TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Petersburg, Va,. September 4, 1864.

Captain ADRIAN TERRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor most respectfully to make the following report of operations on the picket-line in front of this brigade during the past twenty-four hours: The enemy still continue to work at the fort which was blown up by us, extending and strengthening their lines, making work which will cause us much trouble when completed. During yesterday they were throwing dirt on the right of the railroad close to the deep cut. Our trenches are being placed in as good condition as possible. I would state that in our front near the ravine are three dead bodies (our men) unburied. We cannot get to them to bury them unless under a flag of truce. During the night constant firing has been kept up by the enemy's pickets.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS B. POND,

Colonel Sixty-second Ohio Volunteers, Commanding First Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, TENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Petersburg, September 4, 1864.

Colonel N. M. CURTIS,

Commanding First Brigade:

An attack from the enemy is anticipated on the part of our line near the Weldon railroad. In such an event the withdrawal of a portion of the troops of this command will be necessary. The brigadier-general commanding directs that you hold your command in readiness