War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0646 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

September 1, 1864 - 9.30 p. m.

Major General A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The following just received from the commanding officer of the cavalry regiment on picket in front of the Gurley house:

A little before dark this evening the enemy began moving infantry and drove the left of my line some distance back. Everything indicates an attack to-morrow morning.

J. ANDREWS,

Captain, Commanding Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

I think this force must be dismounted cavalry.

D. MCM. GREGG,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

September 1, 1864 - 11.45 p. m.

Brigadier-General GREGG,

Commanding Cavalry:

(Through headquarters Second Corps.)

Your telegraph received. The commanding general sees no reason for changing the order for the movement. All available troops will be held ready at an early hour in the morning to meet any contingency.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. SECOND CAVALRY DIV., ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

September 1, 1864.

Colonel J. P. TAYLOR,

First Pennsylvania Cavalry:

MY DEAR SIR: The order discharging from the U. S. service the First Pennsylvania Cavalry has been received at these headquarters. As you will accompany your regiment to Pennsylvania, there to be discharged with it, I can not permit your departure without expressing to you how much I feel the separation of yourself and command from the Second Division. For nearly two years the First Pennsylvania Cavalry has been under my command, and now, at the end of its term of service, I can proudly say its record is without blemish. The excellence of your regiment resulted from the proper appreciation of discipline by its officers. In the many engagements of this division, in which your regiment has participated, many officers and enlisted men have fallen. They met death facing the foe. Let them be proudly remembered by those who survive. To you, colonel, my thanks are due for the efficient manner in which you have always performed your duty, whether as a regimental or brigade commander. You can return to your home well satisfied that you failed not in your duty, bearing with you the sincere friendship of myself and all your companions in arms.

With the very best wishes for your health, happiness, and success in the future,

I am, very truly, yours,

D. MCM. GREGG,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.