War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0628 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

September 1, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: A rebel deserter from Eighth Alabama Regiment, Sanders' brigade, Mahone's division, who left his picket-line last night and arrived here this morning, reports no changes in the enemy's position. Mahone's division is posted in the trenches from their right to left in the following order: Wright, Mahone, Sanders, Harris, Finegan. The brigades of this division are very much reduced in number. This man states that it is well understood that there are but 500 men in Sanders' brigade, and that it is as large as the brigades of the division will average. They have lost severely in the recent battles. The informant also states that Anderson's and Law's brigades, of Field's division, are lying in a ravine between the lead-works and plank road. General Butler reported these two brigades gone from his front several days ago.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MCENTEE,

Captain, &c.

HEADQUARTERS AMY OF THE POTOMAC,

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

September 1, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The men from Eighth Alabama report that the wagon train spoken of went from Stony Creek to Dinwiddie Court-House, thence to Petersburg on old stage (or plank) road. They do not know the strength of guard with train, or whether they run regular or not. They think that most of their supplies are brought by South Side and Danville railroads.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MCENTEE,

Captain.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

September 1, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Of the three men sent toward Stony Creek Station one was captured and the two others have just returned. They report that they went about three miles below Reams' Station, but could not get through Jones' Hole Swamp, and consequently could not get to the railroad below Reams'. They state that part of the country is thoroughly guarded; that all roads are picketed, and there are guards at every crossing along the streams. They saw negroes who had lately been at Stony Creek Station who told them that there was no work being done on the railroad in that vicinity, and that they were not building a branch railroad. They also stated that the cars do not