War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0551 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

AUGUST 27, 1864.

Colonel SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

A small brigade of infantry and eight army wagons have moved toward our right, on the road to Richmond.

CHAS. F. CROSS,

Lieutenant and Signal Officer.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF VA. AND N. C.,

No. 235.

In the Field, Va., August 27, 1864.

* * * * * * *

VII. The Thirty-seventh U. S. Colored Troops will be sent to Wilson's Wharf, James River, and the Tenth U. S. Colored Troops to City Point. Quartermaster's department will furnish transportation.

* * * * * * *

XII. Colonel E. B. Grubb, Thirty-seventh New Jersey Volunteers, will call in all detachments of that regiment and will then proceed to report to Major General D. B. Birney, commanding Tenth Corps.

By command of Major-General Ord:

R. S. DAVIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, FORT MONROE ARSENAL,

Old Point Comfort, Va., August 27, 1864.

Colonel H. L. ABBOT,

Commanding Siege Train, Broadway Landing, Va.:

SIR: Your letter of the 23rd, with requisition for 100 13-inch mortar shells, was received yesterday, and the shells will be shipped to Colonel Pitkin to-day. With regard to ammunition for siege guns I would state that I shall probably be able to store all that may be received here until you want it. In case I can not do so I will inform you of the fact. Your requisitions for 8-inch shells have all been filled, but I have more on hand which can be sent you if you desire it. The Coehorn mortar ammunition has been and will be sent forward as fast as received.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. EDSON,

Captain of Ordnance, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 27, 1864.

Major-General BIRNEY:

The following statement from the provost-marshal-general's office is sent for your information:

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

A deserter from Sixty-first Georgia, Clingman's brigade, Hoke's division, who just arrived here, reports that he left his regiment last night; that they were then lying between City Point railroad and the Appomattox River. He is a Prussian and understands very little English, and knows little of the enemy's organizations, but he seems quite certain that the balance of Hoke's division is lying in the trenches on