War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0525 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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enemy must have suffered heavily. I think my own losses in killed and wounded severe but not great, as I fought under cover principally. Willcox arrived two miles and a half from the field at 7.15.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 26, 1864 (Received 8 a. m.)

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

The following dispatch received about an hour ago:

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

August 26, 1864.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding:

GENERAL: The enemy did not follow on my rear last night at all. I did not move from the position held by General Willcox until 12 o'clock. The enemy are pressing my pickets a little this morning-I suppose looking for stragglers. Very many men hid in the woods last night, but they are in motion this morning. One of my regiments, mounted, remained at the swamp, on the left of the battle-field, until 11 o'clock. The enemy did not molest it at all. The line is established as you directed. I have one of my brigades near McCann's, the other on the left of Warren.

Your, respectfully,

S. McM. GREGG,

Brigadier-General.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 26, 1864. (Received 9.45 a. m.)

General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

The attack about 5.30 was probably intended to be a simultaneous one, by Wilcox on my center and Heth on my left. The enemy formed in the woods, placed their artillery in position, and opened a heavy cannonade, lasting about fifteen minutes, and then assaulted Miles' front. He resisted tenaciously, but the enemy broke his line. His men had been much wearied rushing over to General Miles and back during the repeated assaults. General Gibbon succeeded in forming a second line, and the enemy, who were pressing on with great enthusiasm, were severely checked by the dismounted cavalry under General Gregg, which behaved handsomely. General Miles regained more of his intrenchments, distinguishing himself. All he had to work with were such small parties as could be rallied and formed by staff officers. The fighting was continuous till dark, the enemy being held in check by artillery, dismounted cavalry, and skirmishers. At dark we withdrew, for reasons stated. The chief of artillery reports that he lost about 250 horses. The enemy made no advance up to a late hour last night, holding, as far as could be seen, some of our captured guns with their skirmish line. They must have suffered heavily. My own loss, including cavalry, will perhaps not exceed 1,200 or 1,500, though this is surmise, as the command is not