War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0511 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

August 25, 1864.

General HUMPHREYS:

General Butler has just sent me word that the command of the department devolves upon me in his temporary absence.

E. O. C. ORD,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 25, 1864.

Major-General ORD,

Commanding Eighteenth Army Corps:

I have just received the dispatch to General Pickett which was intercepted by our signal officers. If there is to be any blowing up it will probably be in front of the Eighteenth Corps. The men who are likely to be exposed, however, ought to be notified, so they will not be stampeded. If we can be on our guard when a mine is sprung the enemy ought to be repulsed with great slaughter. Where do you understand from the dispatch the explosion is to take place?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

August 25, 1864-7.50 p. m.

General MEADE:

In addition to the troops in my trenches I have a reserve of six regiments colored troops, three of them pretty good regiments. If General Hancock is pressed back, or immediate necessity arises for these troops, they are at your service with three days' rations and 100 rounds of ammunition. I think the intercepted dispatch intended to draw our force over to the north side of the Appomattox, where General Birney is in command with 7,500 men, and who is prepared for an attack. If you require my reserve force please send officers to pilot them.

E. O. C. ORD,

Major-General.

P. S.-How goes the battle?

E. O. C. O.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 25, 1864-8.30 p. m.

Major-General ORD:

Many thanks for your offer of troops. I shall not need them. The appearance of the enemy in such heavy force will prevent any further destruction of the railroad, and Hancock will be withdrawn to-night within our lines. I have not heard recently from the field, but just before I left he had repulsed several vigorous attacks of the enemy, inflicting heavy loss on him. Soon after I left the heavy artillery firing commenced, the result of which has not been reported. Willcox's division, Ninth Corps, was near Hancock, moving up to his support when I left. I have no doubt he has punished the enemy severely, and