War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0473 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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number about 2,000. I mention these statements so that Hancock may have what data there is for estimating the force about him. The deserters are, I suppose, those you saw this morning.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 25, 1864-4.15 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac, General Warren's Headquarters:

Mott has sent 2,200 men down the plank road. I am supplying their

places with engineer troops, about 1,000 strong, and the headquarters infantry. Patrick had but forty cavalry, which I sent with Mott's troops.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 25, 1864-5.15 p. m.

Major-General MEADE:

The following dispatch from General Hancock just received:

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 25, 1864-4.15 p. m.

Just received your dispatch by Captain Rosencrantz. I fear it will be too late to have Willcox get here for any practicable purpose, as he is between four and five miles off now. Still I shall order up his division. Had the division come down the railroad it would have been here in time. I desire to know as soon as possible whether you wish me to return from this station to-night in case we can trough safe.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK.

P. S.-Skirmishing going on in my front. Do not know whether the next attack will be on my right or left. I think on my left.

W. S. H.

Hancock telegraphed at 3.40 p. m.:

The enemy just assaulted Miles and were repulsed, and prisoners say badly broken. Anderson's brigade, of Field's division, these prisoners say, the only one.

A. A. HUMPHREYS.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, OFFICE OF THE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

City Point, August 25, 1864-8 a. m .

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: One of our agents left Richmond about noon of day before yesterday, having arrived there on Monday afternoon about 4 o'clock. By direction he inquired from many different sources, and seemed to be entirely satisfied that no troops had been sent either to the Valley or to Atlanta, but understood, on the contrary, that it was considered