War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0467 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC-UNION.

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The road has been thoroughly destroyed some three miles beyond Reams' Station, and within two miles of Rowanty Creek. If it is determined to maintain a permanent lodgment on the Weldon road, it will be necessary to erect some redoubts in other ways strengthen the position and our lines. If the lines from the plank road to the Appomattox can be made secure I see no difficulty in holding the Weldon road with the Fifth, Ninth, and part of the Second Corps, and perhaps extending beyond to the Lynchburg road. I do not deem it advisable, however, to commence the proposed work, involving considerable labor, unless it is settled the position is to be maintained. Is it intended the Eighteenth Corps, on being relieved, are to return to Bermuda Hundred, or will any position be left as a reserve to the Tenth Corps?

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 25, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, City Point:

General Meade has just gone to General Hancock's headquarters. The force of cavalry between the plank road and James River is still small. The cattle should not return yet to Coggins' Point.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CITY POINT, August 25, 1864.

General MEADE:

(Care General Hancock.)

I feel too unwell to-day to get to the front. Think I will take a boat this evening and go to Fortress Monroe and return to-morrow night. Would it not be safe for Hancock to pick up all force he has on the railroad and make one day's march toward Weldon and destroy there a few miles of road, and return by a road farther east that the one he goes on?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

August 25, 1864-2 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Hancock reports the enemy passing his left and threatening the plank road in his rear. I don't think he can destroy much more of the railroad that he has if the enemy interrupt him, because his force is so small that he must keep it in hand to meet attacks and have but small working parties. Movements reported by signal officer in connection with statements of deserters in this morning lead to the conclusion that Lee is about making an effort to get us away from the railroad. This will take, I think, the form of passing our left and threatening our rear on the plank road. I am making preparations to meet this contingency. SHOUld Hancock be pressed or the enemy interposed between him and Warren I shall withdraw him to the plank road.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.