War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0466 Chapter LIV. OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C.

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CITY POINT, VA., August 25, 1864-11 a. m.

(Received 6 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

It is understood in Richmond that Fitz Lee has been ordered back from the Valley with his cavalry division. I have no doubt of the truth of the rumor. If the men of the Second Division now in Washington can be remounted and returned here, and horses sent to remount those here without horses, we will be strong enough and can render their cavalry almost useless.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 25, 1864-2.30 p. m.

(Received 6 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

Pickett's and Field's divisions are here. You can say this General Sheridan, and that there is no doubt about it. One regiment from each of the four brigades of Pickett's division were detached a couple of weeks ago, and for some time I did not know but that they had gone to the Valley. There regiments are now back.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 25, 1864-8.30 p. m.

(Received 7 a. m. 26th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

Up to the last accounts this afternoon from General Hancock, who is south of Reams' Station, he had been attacked several times to-day, but had repulsed every assault. Since the last dispatch very heavy and continuous artillery firing has been heard in that direction, continuing until dark. When I hear from there will telegraph you again.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 25, 1864-10 a. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Everything is apparently quiet this morning. Last evening the signal officers reported large bodies of the enemy moving along the Weldon railroad near the lead-works, going southwardly, and this morning they report the disappearance during the night of camps from our front. This intelligence has been communicated to Generals Warren and Hancock, and the latter instructed to move with caution and be on the alert, and in case he finds the enemy interposing between himself and Warren to return and rejoin the army. The last dispatch from Hancock is 6 a. m., in which he reports that in consequence of the above intelligence he has this morning ceased work on the railroad till he can satisfy himself the road is clear of the enemy and his rear unthreatened.