War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0465 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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that the order was given to Colonel Spear at his request. If so, I question very much whether the interests of the service would be promoted by detaching him from his division on his own suggestion, as his judgment cannot be compared with his merits as an individual soldier. I respectfully request that the necessity of the case be submitted to General Gregg. At the same time I consider it my duty to report that there are two large gaps in the line between the Jerusalem road and the James River-one on the left and the other on the right of Mount Sinai Church, my command being insufficient at present.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 24, 1864-11.30 a. m.

Brigadier-General KAUTZ,

Commanding Division Cavalry:

Your dispatch of 9 a. m. is received. The commanding general requests me to say that you misapprehend the circumstances under which Colonel Spear's command was retained on the Weldon railroad. The commanding general gave the order without any representation from Colonel Spear, or any expression of opinion by him. It was based upon the strength of the enemy's cavalry there (two division), and the active operations now going on the Weldon railroad, which require all the force that can be rendered available without excessive weakening of important points. With your reduced force the commanding general expects you to look after only those avenues of approach that are most likely top be used by the enemy.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CITY POINT, August 25, 1864.

Honorable EDVIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I start at 4 p. m. from Fortress Monroe. Will start from there to return to-morrow night.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 25, 1864-5 p. m.

(Received 7.15 a. m. 26th)

Honorable EDVIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

There are indications of the enemy attacking us this evening or in the morning. I shall not therefore go to Fort Monroe as I telegraphed you this morning.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

30 R R-VOL XLII, PT II