War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0443 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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in the Richmond papers, it would just make five. There is no doubt the enemy suffered severely in his attacks on the 21st. A deserter told me his brigade (Kirkland's) had lost 300 men.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

August 24, 1864.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Following telegram forwarded for your information:

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS,

August 24, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

The following additional report has just been received from Colonel Roberts:

"The troops reported as having stacked arms in line opposite my brigade front have withdrawn their right somewhat to seek shelter in the adjoining woods from the shells thrown by our batteries. There are two stand of colors visible along the stacks and the men are building fires, as if preparing their meal."

From the above it does not appear probable that the enemy are massing in my front with a view to attack.

E. O. C. ORD,

Major-General.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, August 24, 1864-1.30 p.m.

General HUMPHREYS:

A division of the Tenth Corps was yesterday ordered to Ord's support. General Grant has telegraphed to inquire if it is on the road and to hurry it up. Tell Mott to be vigilant and have any reserve he may have ready to co-operate with Ord. In case of attack notify Ord.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 24, 1864-noon.

(Received 6.10 a.m. 25th.)

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General:

Cavalry horses are needed to mount dismounted men. I will inform you shortly how many, as soon as Generals Gregg and Kautz can be heard from. I had asked for 500, part of which had been received. Please cause more to be sent at once, if possible. Both these generals are doing successful fighting on the Weldon road, and if kept well supplied now with horses may be able soon to strike the Danville road.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Quartermaster.