War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0422 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC

August 23, 1864-7.30 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The following dispatch received from the plank-road station:

7.30 A. M.

The force at Weldon railroad occupy the same position as last evening. New works near fort on line of railroad, mentioned in yesterday's reports, look as if the enemy had worked on them all night. They extend into the woods left of fort, south of the fort on the one side and on the other disappear in woods near the brick house, and have assumed quite a formidable appearance. The brick house is about half a mile or less from the fort and toward Petersburg. No change in our immediate front, except about a dozen of tents being put up where small camp was broken up yesterday. All quiet.

FULTON.

Your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Major and Chief Signal Officer.f

WALTHALL HOUSE, August 23, 1864-9.45 a.m.

Major FISHER:

There is a large camp, as of troops in bivouac, at a point left of the Weldon railroad as seen from here and bearing south 40 degrees west. The line of it runs east and west, and there appears to be considerable activity at that point. Two engines have been at the Weldon depot and one or more at the Lynchburg depot since daylight. Steam rising over trees at Pocahontas indicates the presence of an engine at that place.

C. L. DAVIS,

Captain and Signal Officer.

PLANK ROAD SIGNAL STATION,

August 23, 1864-11.15 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The enemy are very busy fortifying in the vicinity of the Weldon railroad. In addition to the line of works reported as being constructed on the east side, of the railroad and crossing south of the fort and extending westward, they are throwing up another line in the woods to the rear of the fort. The fort is located west of the railroad. There seems to be a slight increase in the number of the enemy in the line of intrenchments in our immediate front, but it is still comparatively a weak line as regards the number of men in them. At 9.40 a.m. a train of seventeen wagons and two ambulances passed southward west of the Weldon railroad.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Major and Chief Signal Officer.