War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0419 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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to him and he cannot carry any trains or reserve ammunition. He should, therefore, return or be re-enforced. If Warren replies he can take care of himself, and it is deemed the line from the plank road to the Appomattox is secure, Gibbon's division can be sent to Miles, and another brigade of cavalry; but this is extending very far and leaves no means of repairing any casualties should the enemy, by a successful movement, penetrate our line at any point. I should be pleased to have your instructions upon these points.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 23, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

The Richmond papers of the 22nd claim to have captured from Warren on Saturday morning 2,700 prisoners. Did Warren lose any such number? No report yet received shows it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

August 23, 1864-10.45 a.m.

General GRANT:

Warren's official returns show as follows: August 18: Killed, 66; wounded, 478; missing, 392. August 19; Killed, 46; wounded, 218; missing, 2,457. General Warren was in hopes many of the above missing were stragglers. It should be observed the above report is exclusive of the Ninth Corps, who also lost prisoners on the 19th. It is therefore probable the Richmond papers are not far in error.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

August 23, 1864-12 m.

General GRANT:

I have a dispatch from Warren advising me he has so strengthened his position he feels secure against any attack without the aid of the Second Corps. In deciding upon the movements of this corps (Second) an important consideration must be held in view-the present condition of all but the main and old roads. All others, country, and cross-roads, are impassable for artillery and wagons. The rain of last evening will, I fear, keep them so for some days, or until we have fair weather-a warm sun and drying winds. The question therefore of supplying any large force at a distance from the main army or carrying supplies enters into the expediency of movements. With pack-mules we can keep up supplies if the troops are not too far removed from the trains. The trains cannot be taken along. This dispatch is intended as a continuation of the one sent this a.m. making your views.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.