War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0391 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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it relieve the Second Corps, holding to the left of the Eighteenth. This would leave some reserve for the line of the Tenth and Eighteenth Corps, and would enable the concentration of the Second Corps for further operations.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 22, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding,&c.:

It is my desire to hold the Weldon road, if it can be held, and to thoroughly destroy it as far south as possible. I do not expect to attack the enemy behind his intrenchments, unless he sends off a large part of his force. There is no necessity, therefore, for Warren moving from where he is unless he gains a better position by doing so. I intend to send all of the Tenth Corps that can be spared from Bermuda to take the place of the Eighteenth, and to place the latter back on high ground where it will support our whole line from the Appomattox to the plank road, and will, at the same time, be loose to go wherever it may be needed. Thinking it possible, however, that the enemy might,during to-day or to-morrow, concentrate all his forces to drive Warren away, I have directed General Butler to hold the Tenth Corps where it is, to make the attack contemplated for this morning should the enemy do so.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 22, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding,&c.:

Twenty-five hundred cavalry were seen moving toward Petersburg this morning. They will probably try to get to Warren's left to-day, either to drive in the working party on the railroad or to operate on his rear. Do you not think it advisable to move a division of infantry a few miles down the road to be ready for them?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Weldon Railroad,

August 22, 1864-11.20 a.m.

General GRANT:

I find the enemy has left Warren's flank (left), and apparently his front between this point and the works in front of Petersburg. I also find that Warren is occupying the most favorable point in case a permanent lodgment on the railroad is determined on. There is no object, therefore, in advancing him unless it is intended to attack the enemy's works. I have accordingly directed him to remain in his present position,pushing his skirmishers forward till they feel the enemy. Parke's corps is on the right, completing the line from here to the plank road. Hancock has one division in reserve and the other I have sent to assist