War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0357 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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JONES' HOUSE, PLANK ROAD, August 21, 1864-2.30 p.m.

General GRANT:

Telegram of 1.10 received. I had just received one division of Hancock's to Warren's left. I have not ordered the other one. The third (Mott's) is holding our intrenchments. I have sent you a dispatch from Warren announcing another repulse of the enemy. As soon as I get on the field and Hancock is up I will assume the offensive - before if practicable. Hancock's people, however, are very weary and will not be fit for much to-day and will not much more than get into position. The condition of the roads is a great drawback. Everything has to be packed across the plank road.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS, Weldon Railroad, August 21, 1864-5.25 p.m.

General GRANT:

Hancock's men are so exhausted with their long march that nothing can be expected of them this afternoon. Having moved Hancock over to the left I have placed Parke on the right, and he is extending to make the line and connection over to the plank road. The enemy appear to have abandoned their intention of turning Warren's left and now show some signs of a movement on his right. My solicitude in desiring to have line of slashing across to the plank roads id based on the fact that the enemy may move on Warren's left and turn our intrenchments resting on the plank road, which cannot be held if turned. This would compel the abandonment of this position and might embarrass us to recover our intrenchments. If the enemy do not make this move before night, Parke I think will prepare the line so as to prevent it.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 21, 1864-8.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding,&c.:

Between the Appomattox and Baker's [Bake-House] Creek the enemy are supposed to very weak. General Butler is preparing two assaulting columns to-night with the view of breaking that line at daylight in the morning. If successful he will endeavor to clear out the entire line of the enemy south from the Howlett house and establish himself with all his force on the line of Swift Creek. With the Tenth Corps he ought to be able to hold his ground all day, if he gets through, and could only be driven away by drawing largely from Petersburg. I cannot say now what is best to be done with your forces in connection with this, nut notify you so that you can take advantage of any weakness of the enemy. I shall near and inform you the results of Butler's efforts, and can tell better the best directions to give.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.