War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0356 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, August 21, 1864-1 p.m.

General GRANT:

Telegram 12.45 received. Instructions have gone to Warren embodying the spirit of your suggestions - that is, to assume the offensive. Ord has reported he can spare 800 men, and he has been requested to extend his left with that amount, and Mott allowed to extend his left proportionately. This will free so many men for Warren. I shall move Hancock up as soon as he can make anything of an obstacle to prevent the enemy getting in between Warren's position and the plank road. Telegraphic communication with Warren is interrupted just now. The main roads running into Petersburg are passable. It is the cross-roads which, by the passage of artillery and trains, have since the rains become impassable.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General

CITY POINT, VA., August 21, 1864-1.10 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding,&c.:

Do you not think it likely the enemy are preparing for a heavy attack on Warren this afternoon? If such is the case, would it not be better to move Hancock up to his support at once, and leave the slashing to troops that will be set free by Ord? I have directed Ord either to assault on his front or to extend and relieve Mott, favoring the latter. You will know very soon which he thinks best.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, August 21, 1864-1.30 p.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT:

The following has just been received from General Warren. General Meade left here half an hour since for General Warren's headquarters. It is expected that we shall again have telegraphic communication with General Warren's headquarters in a few moments:

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS, August 21, 1864-11 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

The enemy attacked us both on the north and west with Hill's and Bearuegard's troops. We repulsed them, too, easily. They did not come on far enough to get the effect of our fire. I have a general order to push out, but the woods favor the escape of the troops. We have three battle-flags and probably 400 prisoners that I know of. I hope they will try again. General Cutler is wounded by a piece of shell in the face, not seriously. Colonel Dushane is killed.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

11.30 a.m.- All quiet now. The line being down I send this by an orderly.

G. K. W.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.