War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0304 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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own line or not. It is the instruction of the major-general commanding to leave the line pretty much with the pickets to hold, and to use nearly all his force for assault, if made. Commanders will have their lines carefully examined and carefully watched for any practicable point that may exist of any sign of weakness that may be shown. Two days' rations will be issues at force.

By order of Major-General Hancock:

F. A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

August 19, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel F. A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps:

COLONEL: In reply to your telegram I have the honor to report that 151 are missing in this command, all from the Second Brigade, of which 102 are supposed to be taken prisoners.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. MOTT,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

August 19, 1864 - 8.40 p. m.

Major General A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

I have the honor to report that prisoners taken by my pickets say that they broke through General Warren's right, through the Thirteenth [Nineteenth?] Indiana. The Seventh Wisconsin connects with my left, but report no connection on their left. Prisoners report three brigades as the attacking force, commanded by Archer, Clingman, and Mahone.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. MOTT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 19, 1864.

Colonel JOHN PULFORD,

Commanding Second Brigade:

COLONEL: The brigadier-general commanding directs that the regiments belonging to General Bragg's brigade be ordered by you to join your line the first thing in the morning, following the telegraph line. You will give the necessary attention to this matter, so as to have General Warren's request (as above) carried out. General Warren telegraphs at the same time that he has made his arrangements to fight at daybreak if the enemy chooses; if not, he will re-establish the line at that time. If the fight should take place and the line not be re-established, you will refuse your left somewhat, throwing out vedettes sufficient to keep pu a connection. This matter must be attended to promptly.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN HANCOCK,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.