War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0301 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 19, 1864 - 7 p. m.

General GRANT:

Brigadier-General Girardey's death is noticed in the papers of the 19th, and the following appears in the editorial:

The battles of Monday and Tuesday. - We have authentic information that in the series of severe engagements fought on this side of the river during Monday and Tuesday, culminating in the battle below White's Tavern on Tuesday evening, our entire loss - killed, wounded, and missing - does not exceed 1,000. We believe that our killed will scarcely number 100. The enemy's killed alone will exceed our losses from all causes - the killed, wounded, and prisoners. Grant's loss is not less than 7,000 or 8,000.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

(Same to General Meade.)

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 19, 1864 - 7.10 p. m. (Received 7.22 p. m.)

General GRANT:

Desiring to carry out your wishes here, I have had, since my last telegraph, careful examinations of the enemy's line by my chief of staff and General Miles, to whom I propose to give the attacking column. They are of the opinion I expressed to you, that by putting in a strong force at a certain point on my line we can break through the enemy's line, probably capturing 300 or 400 prisoners and possibly two guns, but that it is a question as to whether we could hold it, as the point to be attacked presents no peculiar feature and is not as high as the surrounding ground. It is an important question how many men the enemy have opposite me now. I can only say their pits are well filled. I would like to know the latest information you have on this point, and I would like your views on the matter of the assault, as you know what is occurring elsewhere as well as here. a rebel paper of 19th speaks of the engagements here, some admitting 1,000 casualties, claiming that we had 1,000 killed. They do not claim many prisoners.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, August 19, 1864 - 8 p. m.

General HANCOCK:

I have no information of the withdrawal of any troops from the north side of the river further than I telegraphed you to-day, and those proved to be cavalry and in less numbers probably than a division. I do not think it advisable to assault unless you feel satisfied that you will gain a decided advantage. I want principally the enemy so occupied that he cannot send off any of his forces, and attacks made only when he leaves a weak place or where he can be surprised. From your description I hardly think it advisable to let General Miles attack in the morning, but you are a better judge of this matter than I am. Exercise your own judgment.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.