War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0300 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 19, 1864-12.10 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I have not discovered anything going out of the enemy's line in my front, yet I am having careful examination made with a view to assault. If, however, the lines appear to be well manned I cannot promise success. A movement down the Charles City road with 6,000 or 8,000 infantry and the cavalry might be more successful than an assault on the lines here; but if you consider an assault preferable I will make it at the best point I can determine.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK.

CITY POINT, VA., August 19, 1864.

Major-General HANCOCK:

I did not intend to order how you should attack or whether you should attack at all. Assault, if you think it can be done successfully, and in the manner you deem best. All I have to say is that I feel no doubt but you can use all your force upon any point you deem best.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, August 19, 1864-12.40 p. m.

(Received 1 p. m.)

Major-General HANCOCK:

If you can possibly spare a brigade of cavalry to go to our left to support the Fifth Corps, send it. There will be no necessity of waiting for night to start it.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 19, 1864-2.40 p. m.

General GRANT:

I have ordered one brigade of cavalry to report to General Meade. The order went out a little before 2 p. m.

WINFD'S S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

August 19, 1864-4.25 p. m.

General GRANT:

I have just returned from a careful examination of my line. My commanders have also made careful reconnaissances. But one point is seen where an assault in considered practicable, this being just below the dam at Fussell's Mill. The enemy's line is about 200 paces from our skirmish line. As to whether it can be held if taken, I cannot say. I think I will try it at daylight in the morning. This place is filled with men as close as though on parade. It is about the only place where the pickets do not fire on each other.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK.