War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 0295 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 19, 1864-9.45 p. m.

General GRANT:

I send dispatch* just received from Warren. I think he is not aware that three of his regiments that were on picket are now in connection with Parke's pickets on the old line. This I get from Parke, who said he could not find out whether three these regiments had any connection with the rest of the Fifth Corps. If Warren has included them in the missing it will reduce his losses in this respect. I have telegraphed him to inquire. I expect he will be attacked again in the morning, as the enemy are very tenacious of their hold on the Weldon road, and will not be likely to give it up without great effort.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., August 19, 1864-10.11 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.:

Can you not spare Mott's division from the line to re-enforce Warren? The enemy have evidently taken everything from their line and would think of no attack except to dislodge our troops from the railroad. I will bring Hancock back to-morrow night, and then the Tenth Corps will relieve the Eighteenth, giving us more troops foot-loose.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 19, 1864-11 p. m.

General GRANT:

It will not be possible to withdraw Mott from the lines, for it would leave the whole of the line recently held by the Fifth corps to be held by the colored division of the Ninth corps, less than 4,000 strong. Warren, I think, has men enough, provided the enemy do not re-enforce from the James. Warren, with his own corps and the two divisions of the Ninth Corps, ought to have, after his losses, nearly 20,000 men, and I cannot believe the enemy can have over 12,000. With this preponderance he ought not only maintain his lodgment on the railroad, but should be able to drive the enemy into his fortifications. I have suggested to him to try it to-morrow morning, as the way to stop any further flaking by the enemy. I have, however,left it to his discretion, dependent on the temper of his men, of which he is a better judge than I am. Instead of relieving the Eighteenth Corps, who are familiar with the line they now occupy, I would suggest the Tenth relieving Mott and the colored division of the Ninth that is holding the lines up to the plank road. Then Hancock could go to the Weldon road and the Ninth hold between the plank and Weldon road.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

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*See Warren to Humphreys, 8.15 p. m., p. 308.

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